France, the rogue-led country

FRANCE, THE ROGUE-LED COUNTRY

France today is a rogue-led country, on the verge of dictatorship. Democracy is no longer a word fit to describe it. A former politician, now retired from public life, Arnaud Montebourg once said France had become a «démocrature ». 1

How right he was !

The Italien writer Malaparte once wrote that a dictatorship was a totalitarian regime in which anything that was not forbidden was compulsary. We are not quite there yet.

But we have lost the kind of regime known as democracy in which the supreme power is exercised by the people through a system of representation and free elections.

Since the election of Nicolas Sarkozy in 2007 and even more so since the election of so-called « socialist » François Hollande 5 years later, the people have come to realise how rigged the elections were. We are allowed to vote – but our vote isn’t taken into account. We are allowed to demonstrate – but we can be thrashed for it. We can still criticize the government – but so what ? We can vote for the Labor Party or the Conservative Party – but basically things will run their course to even more damaging ultra liberalism and globalization, whatever kind of elected government in power.

But much worse is looming ahead that the election of President Macron has helped to highlight.

It is as if little by little the average citizen was being crushed and bled white by two different types of rogues : the upper-class white-collar rogue that is above the law and devises all sorts of tricks to smash and sell what’s left of France and the lowlife at the bottom that is given plenty of scope to raise hell, and kill us – or drive us away out of the country.

At no point in history – or so it seems to me – has a country like mine today been utterly willing to promote high treason, treachery, vandalism, corruption, arson, theft, robberies, mass murder and embezzlement and at the same time been so very eager to push the country into foreign arms.

True enough, we have known foreign occupation before ; many French people in the 14th and early 15th century had been staunch supporters of English occupation on our soil ; the same may be said of German occupation in the 20th century. But at least, there used to be heroes who stood up, fought back, said « no, we won’t endorse it » and were prepared to die fighting for freedom and justice. And they did overcome in the end.

But that’s the thing ! Today we are NOT supposed to be under foreign occupation ! But that’s exactly how the situation could best be described. We are under the thumb of foreign lobbies like Monsanto, foreign companies that don’t pay any taxes like Starbucks or Google or Amazon, we have to obey the demented rules of a Europe that no longer means anything to us, we have to stick to the IMF regulations even though those very regulations are turning us out of a job and home and while the exceedingly wealthy are actually becoming richer thanks to Macron’s flat tax, we the people are being overtaxed and ransomed. The whole of France is being sold bit by bit : in the Bordelais, 130 wine estates have been sold within the last 5 years to the Chinese. Castles like Montesquiou-Fézensac, are sold to Russian entrepreneurs or Qatari fortunes. Besides the PSG, the Qatar now owns the Carlton in Cannes, the Royal Monceau in Paris and a few others. In 2011, the State owned 3 % of the financial capital of French companies, as opposed to 40 % in the 1980’s. From 50 to 70 % of Lafarge, Michelin or Sanofi-Aventis shares are now in foreign hands. To sell off state assets has become a national sport these days. In 2014, Alstom that had been one of our industry flagships was sold off to the American General Electric with the support of the then Minister of Economy… Emmanuel Macron.  And the list is endless. Airbus is going to be next.

Yet, we seem to be lobotomized, anesthetized, unable to do anything but express some half-hearted criticism. We have been brainwashed into thinking that yes, things are becoming unbearable but we will have to endure them anyway because we have no choice. Sometimes, we allude to a revolution that is sure to happen soon, in some golden future nobody believes in anymore. And why should we ? What good would a revolution do when people are rotten through and through, are even taught the only solutions left are either to leave the country or get corrupt ?

The Benalla affair might pinpoint it altogether : Benalla was – or still is ? – a close adviser of President Macron, and a man said to be his bodyguard too ( but by Mr Macron’s own account NOT his lover ) who thrashed a few demonstrators for pleasure during the May Day marches and got away with it. As it turned out, Benalla’s identity and life story are a bit fuzzy, to say the least. But who are we to ask ?

Demonstrations have been either discouraged on account of the risk of terrorist attacks or crushed, sometimes by violence, for years now. We have almost become accustomed to that kind of thing.

But considering the high level of the person involved, a « commission d’enquête » i-e a top-level official investigative committee was formed to probe into the Benalla affair. What’s more, all the inquest was made public and went on air.

Quite a democracy, France, hey ?

Well, so-so. The inquest was apparently a put-up job, half the MPs decided to walk out, and the inquest fizzled out.

But what appalled me more than the case itself – for to tell the truth, under Sarkozy and Hollande, demonstrators were often thrashed and arrested unduly and during the Hollande era, even peaceful underage kids were arrested and held into custody for 24 hours without their parents being warned or a lawyer being called in and I could bear witness if it came to that – so as I said it was not so much the « official » thrashing that appalled me so much as the literacy of some of the MPs . Or lack thereof.

Can we imagine a British MP saying something like : « I doesn’t know that is what » ? In French, the « Je sais pas c’est quoi ça » 2 is not grammatically correct either but who cares if MPs speak in pidgin French nowadays? Even worse maybe was Mrs Obono’s question during the inquest. What she said was so unintelligible that the chairwoman of the committee had to sternly ask her to please rephrase.

The fact that a large part of our  elected representatives  are either foreign-born or first-generation may partly account for it.

But the problem of course goes deeper than grammar. It seems that almost all our « elected » representatives are either thugs, thickheads or thieves. Or the three altogether. You take your pick.

MP Laetitia Avia is best known today for having badly bitten a taxi driver she disagreed with.

MP Danièle Obono complained that her salary of almost 7, 000 euros was not enough for her to live on ( the minimum salary is about 1,000 euros and most retired people have to do with 800 €) while strongly supporting Algerian-born Houria Bouteldja who calls the white French population « underdogs »3 and demands that « the French idendity should be nuked ».

MP Raquel Garrido « forgot » to pay her payroll taxes as a lawyer while at the time living with her partner, Alexis Corbière, another far-left MP in a Paris apartment that ought to have been occupied by a much poorer family.

MP M’Jid El Guerrab decided to solve the problem he had with politician Boris Faure by smashing the latter’s head with his motorcycle helmet. He still is a MP and never was asked to resign. But that was not enough leniency. Macron himself texted him a message of warm support, adversing him to turn to Ferrand for help. He ended his message with a much appreciated “Kind regards” !

Kind regards from a President to a thug !

The Minister of Culture Françoise Nyssen has illegaly enlarged her Paris publishing house by 150 metres without declaring the fact ( and of course without paying any taxes). That didn’t deter President Macron from taking her along on his trip to Danemark this week.

Richard Ferrand is accused of embezzlement. As a result, he was asked first to swap his position as a minister for that of head of Macron’s political party, And he has just been appointed Chairman of the Parliament.

Sibeth Ndiaye, spokeswoman of Macron, to a journalist who was asking if the reported death of Mrs Simone Veil, former Auschwitz Deportee and great former Minister of Health, was true, texted back « Yes, la meuf est dead ! »4

Today we learn that Agnès Saal, the former Head of the National Broadcasting Institute who got a three-month suspended prison sentence for having spent almost 48,000 € of the taxpayers’ money on taxis has just been offered a high position in the Ministry of Culture.

The Minister of Ecology, Nicolas Hulot, was the only one honest enough to resign this week. He said that since his appointment, he had been able to do nothing for the environment and that today’s France is run by lobbies, not ministers.

The Macron era is corrupt but so it was before, I admit. However things are looking worse. I would like to know why 440, 000 euros a year are allotted to Mrs Macron ? What particular skills are being rewarded here ? ( apart from the one which consisted in her seducing her 15-year old student when she was turning 40 and having him marry her for whatever good reason best known to themselves )  What job does she do that actually is worth that amount of money ?

That’s without mentioning her spending half a million euros of the taxpayers’ money on chinaware and swimming-pools. Why should we finance Mr and Mrs Macron’ s private jet and all their trips abroad while there is no money left for hospitals, schools and roads, which can now compete unfavourably with those found in developing countries ?

Everyday something comes up that irks the taxpayers. We are currently hiring a couple of Chinese pandas for 2 million euros a year, and the baby panda that was born here costs us 400, 000 € yearly too, and that’s without counting the vets’ salaries, the food, the healthcare and stuff. I love pandas but I wonder whether the money could not have been rather spent on hospitals.

And what can be said of Mr Macron’s little party at the Elysée Palace on Music Day, last June ?

The way it turned out, people wondered whether the Macron couple weren’t into gang bang parties and if so, why we should have to foot the bill.

But he is the one to belittle us ! President Hollande used to call us « the toothless » ; President Macron’s demeaning comments are endless :  « the people who are nothing », « the lazybones » « the Gauls that hate change » « the illeterate » « the populists » …

Down the line, the lowlifes are being protected too. Although acts of delinquency are estimated to cost about 115 billion each year, the assets coming from the black market, drug-trafficking and other illegal businesses are now officially part of our GDP !5

So that may explain why the lowlifes are protected, much more than the average citizens, these days.

Here are a few anecdotes that are true :

In Nantes, in July 2018, a riot started when a young man, Aboubakar Fofana, was inadvertently killed by the police while trying to escape. An arrest warrant had been issued against him for a year. Consequently, for 4 nights in a row, the local youth burned down the whole city and shot rounds of ammunition. About 30 cars were burnt down, so were the local library, a school, the town hall and two malls. Three men only were arrested and the verdict ? A three-month suspended prison sentence for the lowlifes and the indictment for the policeman. As in the case of Adama Traoré, the whole far-left community not only supported the deliquents against the whole population but there was no end to their screeching against « constitutional racism ».

Funnily enough, when Adrien Perez was stabbed to death during the same month of July in Grenoble while trying to defend his friends against Younes El Habib et Yanis El Habib, not only were there no riots but the far-left kept decidedly silent. End of the affair. Except for the parents, of course, but who cares ?

Nearer to me is the case of Amel B. I could tell you her last name, her current address and many other details about her. But I can’t. I would end up in jail if I did, and that’s only if I’m lucky.

Still I can’t help giving you the lowdown on Mrs Amel B. And am ready to stand in the dock for it. She was born in Algeria and came with her two teenage sons to France a few years ago. She pretended to be a widow and a hairdresser and was lucky enough to find a fool of a woman to let her rent her apartment.

All went rather well till she got her papers, « carte de séjour », we call it. At that point, she was free to do whatever she wanted. She got welfare money, of course, and family allowance and… and…

Thing is when  as a foreigner you get  your carte de séjour, you can nuke the whole country, you’ll never be expelled.

But getting money for no work was not enough. Her sons started drug dealing and motorcycle stealing. The neighbours started to complain but as they were threatened, they soon stopped. The landlady went to the police however and filed a complaint. Nothing was done. The boys were left free to continue.

About six months after that, the eldest son was arrested. He had tried to steal a woman’s purse in the street while riding a scooter. As bad luck would have it, the woman hung on to her purse. The versions differ as to what happened next. Some say the woman was dragged off her feet, that her head hit the pavement, that she fell into a coma and died. Some say she recovered.

Whatever the case might be, the eldest son of Amel B. was arrested.

The second son fared no better. Rumor has it that he ordered a hit. Part of the turf war, you understand ? Only the guy he had chosen as a hitman was unexperienced  and got caught. So of course he denounced his accomplice and both ended up in jail.

You think that at that point, Mrs Amel B. was asked to leave France ? That she stopped getting government money ? That she was partly held responsible for her teenage sons ?

Not at all.

She stopped paying the rent and stopped working. That’s it. But she is still on welfare money.

Amel B. owes something like 25,000 € to her landlady, which she will never pay,. And that’s ok as far as our « justice » is concerned. Her landlady had to hire a lawyer, which cost even more money. The case went on for 15 months or more until a court of justice actually said a bailiff could expel her.

He did.

In less than 6 hours, she got the keys back. She had « high protection », as she put it, which I do not doubt since the bailiff also said so, although he refused to say who « the high protection » was. He had a family to protect, he said.

The funny (?) thing is that of course, as usual,  Amel B. ‘s sons will be Allah-enlightened in jail, I have no doubt. When they come out, they ( either one or the other or both) will trigger a terrorist attack in the name of Allah. Then the authorities, as usual, will admit that the « Algerian-French brothers » ( because by then, in about 2 or 3 years’ time they are allowed to ask for French citizenship) were known to have been radicals. End of the affair. How many will die ? But that’s ok. As Shakespeare once put it, Polonius is at dinner. « Not where he eats, but where he is eaten. » And so are we.

In the meanwhile, the so-called landlady is ruined. Her apartment is on the verge of facing foreclosure. But that’s ok. She is not the only one in France, as can be seen in the newspaper clipping below.

 But can we imagine any other nation in which a deputy prefect would actually state : « An inquiry is going on, to make sure that the pain we are going to inflict on the tenants who haven’t paid their rents for years , by turning them out of the house, is not too mch for them to bear » while the landlady has actually become a homeless drifter, due to the non-payments of the rent ?

No ? Well, welcome to France !

So there is a growing feeling that the only solution to our predicaments is the way out. Since 2015, 2.5 million French people have emigrated. And the trend is not lessening. In the meanwhile, first-generation French people like Rokhaya Diallo struggle to have apartheid implemented in France in the name of freedom, leaving us no option but to get out fast before we might be at dinner.

Sometimes, I too, dream of going away. But I’m an aging woman and am not sure I’ll have the pluck to start from scratch in foreign land. Or whether I have any special skills to recommend me.

But that’s ok, I guess. That’s the fate of Elois.The lazybones, as Macron put it, just fit to be devoured by Morlocks.

Laurence Esbuiée© August, 30th, 2018

1« démocrature » : , blend word composed of « democracy » and « dictatorship » ( « dictature » in French )

2 «  I don’t know what it is all about. »

3-  The word in French is “souchien” meaning “underdog” and “of French descent”.

4( franglish) « Yes, the chick is dead ! »

5http://www.leparisien.fr/economie/le-marche-de-la-drogue-bientot-comptabilise-dans-la-richesse-nationale-31-01-2018-7532817.php